Federal Government Economic Reform and Governance Project : Restructuring (2013)

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Sunday, April 29, 2018  11.56PM / Document of  The World Bank (originally issued on 2013/01/11)

 

Abstract

The objective of the Federal Government Economic Reform and Governance Project (ERGP) for Nigeria is to make an Improvement of the federal government's administrative, financial, human resource and statistical systems. 

The extension is necessary to enable the full roll-out of the all the modules under the first phase of the Government Integrated Financial Management Information System (GIFMIS) as well as to enable the project provide adequate support for the take-off of the newly-created Technical Services Department (comprising three units - oil and gas, public-private partnership and tax policy) within the Federal Ministry of Finance as part of the continued organization restructuring of the Ministry. 

The ERGP is supporting required technical (consultancy) services for this department as well as the acquisition of office and Information and Communication Technology, or ICT equipment. 

This will be the second extension of the project. The project closing date was in 2009 extended for 24 months. This current request is for extension for a further 4 months to June, 30, 2013 which cumulatively, will be 28 months.


Report No: 75405 v1

RESTRUCTURING PAPER ON A PROPOSED PROJECT RESTRUCTURING OF NIGERIA FEDERAL GOVERNMENT ECONOMIC REFORM AND GOVERNANCE PROJECT (CREDIT 4011-UNI) BOARD APPROVAL: DECEMBER 14, 2004 TO THE FEDERAL REPUBLIC OF NIGERIA.

DATE OF RESTRUCTURING: JANUARY 11, 2013 

1. The closing date for Nigeria Federal Government Economic Reform and Governance Project, Cr. 4011-UNI, (P088150) will be extended from February 28, 2013 until June 30, 2013. This will be the second extension of the project; the first being in 2009 for a period of 24 months. This current request is for an extension of a further 4 months, which will cumulatively be 28 months. With this proposed extension, the Project will be 8.2 years old at the time of the new closing date.

2. Implementation progress has varied across the various project components with some components (like the strengthening of statistics component) having fully achieved their objectives while some others have experienced certain delays. 

However, many of the components which had initially been off to a slow start or had experienced delays have picked up considerably over the last eighteen months; particularly the GIFMIS implementation, the tax administration reform component and the modernization of external audit component. Some of the main results achieved to date (PDO indicator outcomes) include:

a)   The implementation of the biometric Integrated Personnel and Payroll Information System (IPPIS) in the six pilot federal government departments in 2007 led to the elimination of ghost workers and a convergence between the nominal and payrolls;

b)   The support to capacity building for EFCC operatives in financial intelligence gathering and other investigative techniques has contributed to an increase in the number of economic and financial crime prosecutions by the EFCC from 263 at end-2005 to 1,099 at end-2011;

c)  Support to organizational and staffing reforms as well as to improvements in work processes (through information technology) and capacity building in the pilot civil service agencies contributed to improvements in the quality of services provided by these agencies (as measured by a recent staff and service user survey);

d) support to organizational/institutional development, human resource development and data development in the National Bureau of Statistics (NBS) has contributed to a significant increase in the percentage of NBS statistical outputs that are released within the IMF-General Data Dissemination System (GDDS) time and frequency limits; and

e)    the partial roll-out of the budget execution and treasury single account module of the Government Integrated Financial Management Information System (GIFMIS) has led to the availability of budget performance reports and monthly financial statements on a real-time basis and prompt submission of these reports (within 7 days of each month’s end) by 93 agencies of government, with this number set to significantly increase by end-January 2013.

 

Much of the overall success of the project now hinges on the full implementation of the GIFMIS (first phase), which concerns the majority of remaining resources under the project. Cumulative disbursements now stand at US$ 118 million (of the Credit of US$ 143 million) – a disbursement ratio of 83 per cent. All but the sum of about US$ 6 million are expected to be disbursed by the new proposed closing date. This US$ 6 million will still be outstanding for post-implementation support for the GIFMIS which is expected to be cancelled from the ERGP and transferred to another active project in the Nigeria portfolio. 

While implementation progress has been hampered by some of the delays earlier highlighted, the project objectives continue to be achievable as indicated by the current outcomes on the PDO indicators outlined above, and more so, with an extension of the closing date. 

The performance of the Borrower is satisfactory and all audit reports and unaudited IFRs have been submitted to date. There is neither outstanding external audit report nor IFR for any of the implementing entities. Project performance is currently rated Moderately Satisfactory for IP and Satisfactory for DO. 

3. The proposed extension is necessary to enable the full roll-out of the all the modules under the first phase of the Government Integrated Financial Management Information System (GIFMIS) as well as to enable the project provide adequate support for the take-off of the newly-created Technical Services Department (comprising three units - Oil & Gas, Public-Private Partnership and Tax Policy) within the Federal Ministry of Finance as part of the continued organization restructuring of the Ministry.

The ERGP is supporting required technical (consultancy) services for this department as well as the acquisition of office and ICT equipment. The Ministry of Finance has submitted to the Bank, a work plan for the take-off of this Department which will be fully implemented before the new project closing date. The full implementation of the GIFMIS (first phase) is particularly critical to the overall success of the ERGP; however, due to administrative and procurement delays, the contract for the supply, installation and implementation of the GIFMIS system was only signed in May, 2011 and while an initial project implementation plan had envisaged full roll-out of this phase by August 2012, bureaucratic delays, especially relating to the budget preparation module, contributed to stalling this process and a bit more time is required to achieve full roll-out. In the event that the project is not extended, there is the risk that the GIFMIS vendor will make claims for the delivery of certain modules which the necessary departments of government have not yet tested and confirmed contractual acceptance. Based on a new implementation plan agreed between the vendor and the Federal Government’s Office of the Accountant-General, full roll-out would be achieved by end-June 2013. 

4. This will be the second extension of the project. The project closing date was in 2009 extended for 24 months. This current request is for extension for a further 4 months to June, 30, 2013 which cumulatively, will be 28 months. 


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ABBREVIATIONS AND ACRONYMS

·      EFCC - Economic and Financial Crimes Commission

·       GDDS - General Data Dissemination System

·       GIFMIS – Government Integrated Financial Management Information System

·       ICT – Information and Communication Technology

·       IFR – Interim Financial Report

·      IPPIS – Integrated Personnel and Payroll Information System 


Editorial Team

Regional Vice President:    Makhtar Diop

Country Director:                Marie-Francoise Marie-Nelly

Sector Manager:                  Mark Roland Thomas

Task Team Leader:              Gloria Aitalohi Joseph-Raji


Download the PDF Here –

Official PDF , 4 pages  

 
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